Chuck – Chuck Berry (review)

Chuck Berry. The name means so much: rock and roll, some of the finest guitar playing known, inventive and playful songs. 

To think that everyone from Buddy Holly to The Beatles covered his songs is mind-blowing. Without Chuck Berry the world would be a different place. 

I was lucky enough to see Chuck Berry live on one of his later trips to London. Even in old age, he played the guitar like no one else, attacking the strings, duck-walking and bouncing off of the audience reaction. 

I was thrilled to write a review of his last album, Chuck, for Songwriting Magazine. Read it here.

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August 2017 Playlist (The Proto-Punk Playlist)

Earlier this month I wrote a piece for Louder Than War detailing the start of the punk movement (if you haven’t had a look yet, you can read my article by clicking here).

As part of my research for this piece for Louder Than War, I spent a long time pouring over the early proto-punk songs I used to spend so much time listening to.

This playlist features these top ten songs, along with some other gems from the period and into the punk era.

Here’s the tracklist, with the playlist at the bottom:

  1. Have Love Will Travel – The Sonics
  2. Roadrunner – The Modern Lovers
  3. She Does It Right – Dr Feelgood
  4. Can’t Seem To Make You Mine – The Seeds
  5. Search and Destroy – The Stooges
  6. Politicians In My Eyes – Death
  7. White Light/White Health – The Velvet Underground
  8. Kick Out The Jams – MC5
  9. Personality Crisis – New York Dolls
  10. My Generation – Patti Smith
  11. I’ll Never Get Over You – Johnny Kidd & The Pirates
  12. Psychotic Reaction – Count Five
  13. Lust For Life – Iggy Pop
  14. Typical Girls – The Slits
  15. Teenage Depression – Eddie & The Hot Rods
  16. (White Man) In Hamersmith Palais – The Clash
  17. 96 Tears – ? & The Mysterians
  18. Anarchy In The UK – Sex Pistols

 

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Bob Dylan: Chronologically 

The other day, I was speaking to someone about Michael Connelly, the fantastic crime writer who has a new book out called The Late Show. 

‘Where should I start?’ they asked, after considering my suggestion. 

This got me thinking. 

Michael Connelly has created a parrel Los Angeles. Often, characters from different books appear in different places: a long forgotten detective can appear in a new book without warning. His most famous creation, Harry Bosch, is now featured in an Amazon Prime show called Bosch

The first Michael Connelly book I read was The Poet, which doesn’t feature Harry Bosch. When it came to reading the Bosch books, I read these out of sequence. 

Ultimately, my answer was ‘start at the beginning.’ (Which was advice I admittedly did not follow). In this case, start with the first of the Harry Bosch book series – The Black Echo. You will then see how the character – and writer – develops. 

So what does this have to do with Bob Dylan?

I’ve been a lifelong Bob Dylan fan. Some of my earliest memories are of my Dad playing Dylan records for me. They formed a part of my childhood, like nursery rhymes, I suppose. However, I’d never listened to Bob Dylan’s albums in chronological order. Maybe this would enable me to see how Bob Dylan develops as a songwriter? 

If you’re a Dylan fan, some of his albums you’ll have listened to reluctantly, or avoided completely. I want to give each of these albums the same amount of time, in the correct order. Maybe I’ll learn something.

I will be listening to studio albums only – which means no Bootleg Series – in order of the UK date of release. 

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Playlist for July 2017

In June, Leigh-on-Sea hosts the UK’s largest free folk festival. On Sunday, I wandered to the Crooked Billet stage to see Martin Carthy. The whole area was packed, which meant I had to stand behind a railing at the side. Carthy played, picking his guitar beautifully, and introduced his songs by revealing some of the deep history behind them.

Halfway through his set, someone squeezed past me with a slight shove. I turned round to see if I could move in and let the gentleman pass. To my surprise, it was Wilko Johnson.

I say it was a surprise because I would have thought the pairing was unlikely. Surely Wilko Johnson with Dr Feelgood was musically the polar opposite to Martin Carthy’s folk leanings. But as I pondered it, they aren’t so dissimilar: both are incredible guitar players; each of their music has a rawness to it; both arguably pushed music into a new direction (Carthy allegedly inspired Bob Dylan’s Girl of the North Country, Dr Feelgood inspired the punk movement). After Carthy’s set, I watched as they both shook hands and chatted. Two men, hugely influential in their own sphere.

As you may know, I wrote about Zoe Howe’s brilliant Lee Brilleaux biography a week or so ago. It’s safe to say that I’m on a Dr Feelgood binge and this playlist would always have been weighed down heavily by R&B songs. But after seeing Martin Carthy, I couldn’t resist putting some of his songs in too, as well as other folk artists.

Here’s the playlist:

  1. She Does It Right – Dr Feelgood
  2. Mother Freedom – Bread
  3. Hangin’ Out – Betty Davis
  4. Wild About My Baby – Slim Harpo
  5. Big Boys – Chuck Berry
  6. Messin’ With The Kid – Junior Wells
  7. Roadrunner – The Pretty Things
  8. Bill Norrie – Martin Carthy
  9. Poison – Bert Jansch
  10. Let The Good Things Come – John Martyn
  11. White Freight Liner (Live) – Townes Van Zandt
  12. Scarborough Fair – Martin Carthy and David Swarbrick
  13. Sally Free And Easy – Oscar Dowling
  14. Wrecking Days – Kitty Macfarlane
  15. The Bedmaking (feat. David Swarbrick) – Martin Carthy and David Swarbrick
  16. Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood – The Animals
  17. The More I Give – Dr Feelgood
  18. Around and Around – Rolling Stones

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James Holt – Whatever Happened to John?

James Holt’s new song, Whatever Happened to John? is a Dylan-esque whirlwind. There is a clear nod to John Lennon too, with the bridge sounding reminiscent of Revolver era Beatles.

Holt is clearly an artist to watch out for. He provides the lead and backing vocals, as well as playing all of the instruments featured on the song.

Whatever Happened to John? takes us to a parallel universe. As Holt says: “The inspiration came from a Sky Arts TV programme set in an alternate reality in which John Lennon walked out of the Beatles before their fame in the mid-60s. It’s a fusion of thoughts and ideas and also bears references to George Orwell’s 1984.”

The song, starting out as a blues rocker, leads quickly to a psychedelic meltdown, before taking us back onto the initial riff.

Aside from the Dylan and Lennon comparisons, lines will also be drawn to Fionn Regan’s second album The Shadow of an Empire.

Take a listen to the track below, and be sure to keep a lookout for James Holt in the future.

 

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